Demonstrators gather in Kodiak for 2018 Women’s March

Kodiak’s Women’s March 2018. (Photo by Mitch Borden/KMXT)

Mitch Borden/KMXT

Kodiak joined cities across America this weekend by hosting its second annual Women’s March. People of all ages gathered with their hats, mittens, and homemade signs to walk for women’s rights. KMXT’s Mitch Borden was there and has this report.

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Kodiak kicks off its second Women’s March on a chilly, gray morning.

Crowd: “We’re here. We’re proud. We vote…”

Around 140 people of all ages gathered to walk for women’s rights and Nita Nicholas is one of them. She says she’s marching to be with other women as they stand for gender equality.

“We have to be united. Strong. We have power.”

“Rise up Kodiak. Vote.” “ “I will not be dragged quietly back to the 1950s.” and “Women’s rights aren’t up for grabs.” are some of the signs you can read as the crowd moves up Mill Bay Road, Kodiak’s main business thoroughfare.

Robin Corcoran is carrying one that says “make America kind again.” It’s the same sign she had last year, and the reason she’s holding it again is she doesn’t think the country’s gotten any greater since then.

“I think a lot of people who maybe thought that Donald Trump meant a change are seeing that it was a change for the worse. So if we vote we can hopefully make a change.”

Emotions vary from protester to protester. Some are cheery and hopeful, others seem tired and pessimistic. Sherry Wilmonth though is angry. She says every time the U.S. takes a step forward, it then takes two steps back. One thing that’s got her fired up this morning is the recent federal government shutdown and Congress’s inability to come to a compromise on immigration and those known as “dreamers.”

“I’m appalled to see what has happened to our country. The very idea that they would shut down our government because they won’t make a deal so children who’ve lived here their whole lives cannot continue to stay in the only country they know. That is obscene. It is vulgar.”

Wilmonth says the demonstration is a great way to speak out and to be with others who are worried about the country. Michelle Valdez agrees.

It’s her first time marching. but over the past year the trump administration, among other things, got her thinking it’s time for people to come together, respect women, and fight for what they believe in.

“Rise up. Resist. Don’t be complacent. Stand with your sisters, your brothers, and children.”

As the marchers continue along their route, snow begins to fall and lightly cover the road.

The only thing interrupting the tranquil scene are the shouts from the crowd reminding the community, women are powerful, willing to voting, and are ready for the upcoming midterm elections.

Crowd: “We’re here. We’re strong. We Vote…”

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